Cervinia Spritz N°6

This will be a summer filled with sports: the football world cup, which we will unfortunately only attend as audience; the Giro d’Italia, and thousands of other amateur or professional sporting events. However, I love competitive sports. But to me, sport must be a competitive game. There must be someone to go against, whether it’s alone or in a team, there must be a winner and a loser.

I know you don’t agree with me, Bepi. Nonetheless, it’s within this vision of sportive activity where we can see how it’s a metaphor of life. Let’s take football, for example. The ball hits the goalpost, and it was only that millimeter movement of the foot that would have determined the victory. A gust of wind or a millisecond more would have determined it all. Isn’t that, what happens in life? A second, a distraction or a moment of determination, in the bat of an eye, changed the outcome of a decision, of the present moment and of the future. And what about loyalty? Nowadays, we all speak about honesty, which fundamentally is to not steal from others, or yourself. However, how can that compare to the heroic and pure concept of loyalty? If  I touch the ball, and the arbitrary doesn’t see it, I should tell him anyways. Loyalty, more than honesty, was regarded in ancient times as the symbol of a knight, of a pure soul and a faithful companion. At times maybe “dishonest”, but always loyal. In sports games, there’s always that feeling of childhood that arises – when all that there is, is in that moment, in the ball, in the redness of the cheeks, in the smell of the grass. All there is, is the happiness for the win, or sadness for the loss. Painful, but transient. We don’t have fun like we used to, we only play to win, we strive to win using any medium and anyone who’s against us is expendable. Now, close your eyes just for an instance. Think about the freedom of playing, the thrill of having fun, of the game, and not only about the result. Relive those moments in which, between the loss or the win, we thought there was an infinite moment to enjoy. And now, loyal friend, offer me a drink: I don’t know why, maybe it’s something in the air, but I suddenly feel a small, yet passing, lump in my throat.

Cheers.

BEPI SPRITZ